Macbook Pro cooling pad


macrumors newbie

Original poster

Jun 21, 2018

14

0

Hello, everyone! Is it going to help anything if these macbooks have an aluminum plate under them (with no holes) to cover their internals? So, I’m thinking about getting a cooling pad from Multilaser called “Power Cooler Gamer” to try to lower the temperature a little bit. I was hoping that it would help cool the area beneath it and, as a result, lower the overall temperature. I’m having a problem with my mid-2012 Macbook Pro because it’s running at 60-68 degrees Celsius, and I’m concerned about it.

Also, I use the SMC app to speed up the internal fans on occasion, but I don’t do it very often to extend the life of the computer.

Thanks!

 

macrumors regular

Jan 26, 2017
227
113
London UK

Thank you very much! Hello, everyone! Is it going to help anything if these macbooks have an aluminum plate under them (with no holes) to cover their internals? So, I’m thinking about getting a cooling pad from Multilaser called “Power Cooler Gamer” to try to lower the temperature a little bit. I’m having a problem with my mid-2012 Macbook Pro because it’s running at 60-68 degrees Celsius, and I’m concerned about it. I was hoping that it would help cool the area beneath it and, as a result, lower the overall temperature. Also, I use the SMC app to speed up the internal fans on occasion, but I don’t do it very often to extend the life of the computer.

We tried cooling plates, and while they did cool the base, they didn’t really help with performance. To be honest, they just looked silly and took up too much space. SMC fans, on the other hand, are a beast unto themselves; we ran both fans at 3000rpm minimum most of the time. I’d also consider opening the badboy up and using compressed air to clear out the fans. Please keep us updated on your progress. If you bought it in 2012 and haven’t cleaned it out yet, you’re way overdue. Even before you start using SMC Fan Controller, this will drastically reduce temperatures. When my GF’s PC broke down, I had to pull out my old 2012 MBP, and as I was setting her up, I noticed that it was always running so damn hot.

 

unkinkedash

macrumors newbie
Original poster

Jun 21, 2018
14
0

Those cooling pads, in my opinion, will not help much in the long run. I’m going to open it up and clean it properly to see if it makes a difference. Thank you very much!
 

macrumors regular

Jan 26, 2017
227
113
London UK

Some people cut holes in the MBP’s base for proper ventilation, which I wouldn’t recommend, but let us know if there was a lot of dust in there.
 

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unkinkedash

macrumors 65816

May 9, 2017
1,196
942
Austin, TX

Also, I use the SMC app to speed up the internal fans on occasion, but I don’t do it very often to extend the life of the computer. So, I’m thinking about getting a cooling pad from Multilaser called “Power Cooler Gamer” to try to lower the temperature a little bit. Hello, everyone! Is it going to help anything if these macbooks have an aluminum plate under them (with no holes) to cover their internals? I’m having a problem with my mid-2012 Macbook Pro because it’s running at 60-68 degrees Celsius, and I’m concerned about it. I was hoping that it would help cool the area beneath it and, as a result, lower the overall temperature. Thank you very much!

On my 2017 MBP, for example, I regularly hit the mid 40s by connecting two 1440p external monitors via a Caldigit dock… if I run Affinity or watch an HD movie, the temperature will rise to anywhere between 50 and 65 degrees Celsius. Having said that, you didn’t say what you’re doing with your MacBook Pro when it reaches those temperatures. I agree with the others that a cooling pad will have a negligible impact on the actual running temperature of a MacBook Pro. Cleaning out any dust inside the machine and fans, as well as applying fresh thermal paste, would be your best bet. If you’re seeing these temperatures while doing something CPU-intensive, I wouldn’t worry too much about it. Now, if this is the temperature with nothing else running (as confirmed by Activity Monitor), I’d agree that it’s a problem worth investigating. A MacBook Pro running in the 60s (or higher) can be caused by a variety of factors. Chrome, Adobe Suite products, Microsoft Office Suite, and any other photo/video editing software can quickly raise the temperature.

 

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unkinkedash

BionicMan

Suspended

Dec 14, 2018
22
15

Internal temperatures remained constant. I monitored the internal temperatures before and after, and the only thing that cooled was the outside case. I used to have a cooling pad, but I stopped using it because it didn’t make a difference.
 

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unkinkedash

cynics

macrumors G4

Jan 8, 2012
11,726
1,973

That’s because mechanical “fixes,” accessories, and the like can only affect fan speed, not CPU temperature. I’m not familiar with Apple’s thermal management presets for controlling the fan profile, but the long and short of it is that when the CPU gets hot, the fans speed up, the CPU cools off, and the fans slow down…maintaining a specific temperature that balances fan noise, CPU temperature, and thus CPU performance. Cooler rooms cool computers better than hot rooms. On almost any Mac, 60-68 degrees can be considered normal. Cleaning or replacing the thermal paste on the CPU could lower the CPU’s temperatures if the fan is running at full speed. You are, however, still at 68°C. If your fan is running at medium speed while you see 68C cleaning, Apple’s thermal management system (whatever it’s called) will tell the fan that “I don’t need as much fan to maintain 68C” and slow it down. Obviously, there are exceptions, such as when the fan is turned all the way up. Apple devices, like mobile devices, can get hot. TJunction Max is around 105C at Ivy Bridge. This is built into the CPU for self-preservation; if throttling doesn’t help, it will throttle and then shut down. Another factor to consider is the temperature of the environment. Thermodynamic laws dictate that the rate at which heat energy flows to colder objects/states (heat from CPU to heatsink to air) is largely influenced by the temperature differential. For example, on my 2018 13″ i5 MBP, I’m transcoding a 4k video; this is a spike before the fans settled in… You can get into the 60s by doing some background task syncing while you appear to be doing nothing else. Also known as However, it will be much hotter than 68 degrees.

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It’s always a good idea to clean the fans. A MacBook (or any laptop with a similar form factor) will not produce desktop temperatures. If you’re worried about your MacBook Pro, I wouldn’t be. For the next 4-5 years, I’d transcode video on my iMac (large laptop with desktop CPU) for 8 hours a day, 7 days a week, in the 90 degree range. It’s also possible that replacing the thermal paste will help. The reason I mentioned all of this is because you should only expect to see 60-68 with the task you’re working on if you don’t use software. It still works perfectly, and I even cleaned and reapplied thermal paste (Kryonaut) to discover that it hadn’t hardened at all. I’ve discovered that some laptops aren’t as aggressive with temperatures as Apple, and/or that others are more aggressive with fan profiles. However, due to its size, the heat sink is frequently oversaturated. Core 2 reached a temperature of 100°C (TJMax).

 

unkinkedash

macrumors newbie
Original poster

Jun 21, 2018
14
0

I’ll take it somewhere to clean it, and I’ll probably replace the thermal paste as well. Perhaps it is adequate for the temperature!
 

unglued

macrumors 6502

Feb 20, 2016
257
96

So, I’m thinking about getting a cooling pad from Multilaser called “Power Cooler Gamer” to try to lower the temperature a little bit.

In a room with an ambient temperature of 70°F, I use a cooling pad with my 15″ 2018 MBP and get about a 10°F drop (92°F to 86°F low-speed fan, then 86°F to 82°F switching on the high-speed fan) while watching movies in 1080p on a 24″ monitor with the MBP lid closed. I’m not sure about the MBPs from mid-2012, but the cooling pad sensors on my 2018 detect the most heat under the power switch. I’m going to make some changes to see if I can get more cooling out of it. It’s probably not the answer to everything, but it’ll do for now.

 
Last edited:

Ploki

macrumors 601

Jan 21, 2008
4,162
1,440

compressed air to dust it off (it’ll probably make a 10 degree difference) and the thermal paste is probably dead after 6 years.